References

The Beauty Chef pioneered the inner beauty industry with our philosophy that ‘beauty begins in the belly®’ and has a range of bio-fermented, wholefood, probiotic beauty supplements to help balance digestive health and promote glowing skin from within.

Derived from nature and supported by science, The Beauty Chef products are rich in prebiotics, probiotics and postbiotics – for holistic health, beauty and wellbeing.

WE ARE… BIO-FERMENTED

More than 20 years of research has gone into the development of our unique and natural bio-fermentation process called FloraCulture™. This process involves introducing a ‘mother culture’ – containing 14 species of beneficial bacteria and yeasts including those from the genera of Lactobacillus Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces into the ingredients to ferment for a period of 6–8 weeks. The bacteria break down the ingredients – making the nutrients more bioavailable for the body to use – and supercharges their benefits55, creating bioactive nutrition and a broad-spectrum, food-based probiotic for holistic health, beauty and wellbeing.

WE ARE… BIO-FERMENTED

More than 20 years of research has gone into the development of our unique and natural bio-fermentation process called FloraCulture™. This process involves introducing a ‘mother culture’ – containing 14 species of beneficial bacteria and yeasts including those from the genera of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces – into the ingredients to ferment for a period of 6–8 weeks. The bacteria break down the ingredients – making the nutrients more bioavailable for the body to use – and supercharges their benefits, creating bioactive nutrition and a broad-spectrum, food-based probiotic for holistic health, beauty and wellbeing.

WE ARE… MICROBIOLOGIST APPROVED

We work with leading microbiologists on cutting-edge research to deliver scientifically formulated food-based probiotic powders and elixirs which, we believe, are essential for digestive health and skin radiance. We are dedicated to spending more of our time and resources on research into the correlation between gut health and certain strains of bacteria and how they impact the health of the skin as well as overall health and wellbeing.

WE ARE… GUT FRIENDLY

The Beauty Chef formulas contain food-based prebiotics, probiotics and postbiotics to help balance the gut and feed the skin from within. Unlike a probiotic supplement which you may get in the supermarket which only carries one or two strains, The Beauty Chef products offer multiple natural, food-based strains. Our lacto-fermented foods not only product probiotics, they also act as prebiotics – feeding the beneficial bacteria in your gut. Both are essential for helping to balance and boost gut health.

WE ARE… ORGANIC & NATURAL

We use pure Certified Organic (wherever possible) and biodynamic wholefood ingredients in The Beauty Chef products. Studies have shown that organic foods contain greater levels of some nutrients and phytochemicals56 than conventionally grown produce, and when these foods are combined with our natural fermentation process, powerful, live and bioactive formulas are created. The result? Inner Beauty Products that are truly good for your body, beauty and belly.

WE ARE… MICROBIOLOGIST APPROVED

We work with leading microbiologists on cutting-edge research to deliver scientifically formulated food-based probiotic powders and elixirs which, we believe, are essential for digestive health and skin radiance. We are dedicated to spending more of our time and resources on research into the correlation between gut health and certain strains of bacteria and how they impact the health of the skin as well as overall health and wellbeing.

WE ARE… GUT FRIENDLY

All of The Beauty Chef formulas are supercharged – containing food-based prebiotics, probiotics and postbiotics to help balance the gut and feed the skin from within. Unlike a probiotic supplement you may find in the supermarket which often only carries one or two species or strains, The Beauty Chef products offer multiple natural, food-based strains. Our lacto-fermented foods not only product probiotics, but they also act as prebiotics – feeding the beneficial bacteria in your gut. Both are essential for promoting microbial diversity and helping to balance and boost digestive health.

WE ARE… ORGANIC & NATURAL

We only use the cleanest, most pure Certified Organic and biodynamic wholefood ingredients in The Beauty Chef products. Studies have shown that organic foods contain greater levels of nutrients than conventionally grown produce, and when these foods are combined with our natural fermentation process, powerful, live and bioactive formulas are created. The result? Inner beauty products that are truly good for your body, beauty and belly.


THE FUNDAMENTALS OF GUT HEALTH

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FACTORS THAT IMPACT GUT HEALTH

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33Shi, Lye Huey, et al. “Beneficial Properties of Probiotics.” Tropical Life Sciences Research, Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, Aug. 2016

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38Drago L, De Vecchi E, Toscano M, Vassena C, Altomare G, Pigatto P. Treatment of atopic dermatitis eczema with a high concentration of Lactobacillus salivarius LS01 associated with an innovative gelling complex: a pilot study on adults. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2014;48 Suppl 1:S47-S51

39 Gao L et al A Novel Postbiotic From Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG With a Beneficial Effect on Intestinal Barrier Function Front. Microbiol., 14 March 2019 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.00477

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44Victoria Bell, Jorge Ferrão, Lígia Pimentel, Manuela Pintado, and Tito Fernandes, One Health. Fermented Foods, and Gut Microbiota. Foods. 2018 Dec; 7(12): 195. doi: 10.3390/foods7120195

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47 Li M, van Esch BCAM, Henricks PAJ, Folkerts G, Garssen J. The Anti-inflammatory Effects of Short Chain Fatty Acids on Lipopolysaccharide- or Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Stimulated Endothelial Cells via Activation of GPR41/43 and Inhibition of HDACs. Front Pharmacol. 2018;9:533. Published 2018 May 23. doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.00533

48Gonçalves P, Araújo JR, Di Santo JP. A Cross-Talk Between Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids and the Host Mucosal Immune System Regulates Intestinal Homeostasis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2018 Feb 15;24(3):558-572. doi: 10.1093/ibd/izx029.

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OUR SCIENCE

57Victoria Bell, Jorge Ferrão, Lígia Pimentel, Manuela Pintado, and Tito Fernandes, One Health. Fermented Foods, and Gut Microbiota. Foods. 2018 Dec; 7(12): 195. doi: 10.3390/foods7120195

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

59 Iebba V, Totino V, Gagliardi A, Santangelo F, Cacciotti F, Trancassini M, Mancini C, Cicerone C, Corazziari E, Pantanella F, Schippa S. Eubiosis and dysbiosis: the two sides of the microbiota. New Microbiol. 2016 Jan;39(1):1-12. Review. PubMed PMID: 26922981

60 Rosenfeld Y, Shai Y Lipopolysaccharide (Endotoxin)-host defense antibacterial peptides interactions: Role in bacterial resistance and prevention of sepsis Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – Biomembranes Volume 1758, Issue 9, September 2006, Pages 1513-1522

61 Iebba V, Totino V, Gagliardi A, Santangelo F, Cacciotti F, Trancassini M, Mancini C, Cicerone C, Corazziari E, Pantanella F, Schippa S. Eubiosis and dysbiosis: the two sides of the microbiota. New Microbiol. 2016 Jan;39(1):1-12. Review. PubMed PMID: 26922981

62 Williamson G. The role of polyphenols in modern nutrition. Nutr Bull. 2017;42(3):226–235. doi:10.1111/nbu.12278

63 Sun et al. Microbiota-derived short-chain fatty acids promote Th1 cell IL-10 production to maintain intestinal homeostasis Nature Communications 9, Article number: 3555 (2018)

64 Li M, van Esch BCAM, Henricks PAJ, Folkerts G, Garssen J. The Anti-inflammatory Effects of Short Chain Fatty Acids on Lipopolysaccharide- or Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Stimulated Endothelial Cells via Activation of GPR41/43 and Inhibition of HDACs. Front Pharmacol. 2018;9:533. Published 2018 May 23. doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.00533

65 Gonçalves P, Araújo JR, Di Santo JP. A Cross-Talk Between Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids and the Host Mucosal Immune System Regulates Intestinal Homeostasis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2018 Feb 15;24(3):558-572. doi: 10.1093/ibd/izx029.

66 Jürgen Schrezenmeir, Michael de Vrese, Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics—approaching a definition, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 73, Issue 2, February 2001, Pages 361s–364s, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/73.2.361s .